Political protest is on the rise — and with it, a growing need for leaders to speak to protest rallies. This episode, we talk with veteran environmental and climate campaigner Tzeporah Berman about rally speeches: how to plan, write and deliver them for maximum impact.

This two-part episode starts with a discussion on planning your speech and thinking about strategy. We’ll conclude in part two by talking about writing and delivery.

About our guest: Tzeporah has over two decades of experience designing campaigns and speaking to crowds small and large (and very large). She’s one of the leading Canadian voices on climate, energy and sustainability — and she’s had a tremendous impact. There are 40 million hectares of old-growth forest that are still around today in no small part because of her work.

She’s an adjunct professor at York University, and works as a strategic advisor to several First Nations, environmental groups and philanthropic foundations on climate and energy issues. She co-chaired the Alberta government’s Oilsands Advisory Working Group, which developed consensus recommendations on the province’s climate plan.

Tzeporah she co-founded ForestEthics — now called Stand.earth — nearly 20 years ago, and recently returned to the organization as their international program director.

Links: I had the good fortune of collaborating with Tzeporah on a blog post about speaking to rallies a few years ago. Two years on, it’s still the most popular post on my blog.

Here’s more information about Tzeporah from Stand.earth, formerly ForestEthics. You can also find Tzeporah on Twitter and Facebook.

Music: Theme: “Good Times” by Podington Bear (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Podington_Bear/).

Incidental music by Lee Rosevere (https://leerosevere.bandcamp.com/) including “Start the Day” and “Where Was I”. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo: Flickr user Leo Reynolds


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